Everyone knows that riding a motorcycle is more dangerous than a car, and it is a good idea to take a motorcycle safety course before you ever think about taking a bike out on the open road. It will really teach you a lot of things that you will never pick up on your own after years of driving a bike, and these small things really can mean the difference between eventually having a bad accident and maintaining a pristine road record. Here are some counterintuitive tips that can really help with your riding.

1. Straighten Up Before Swerving

When a rider is going around a corner and something suddenly appears in their path, like a large rock or a car, it is their typical instinct to immediately swerve out of the way. This often leads to big trouble as correcting sharply or changing direction even slightly in a deep turn can easily lead to losing control of the bike and crashing to the ground.

Whenever you are in a turn and something sudden comes of nowhere in your path, your first move needs to be to slow down, straighten the bike up, and then swerve around the obstacle or pull to the side of the road (if you can, get off the bike and remove any obstacles that are lying in the road, to protect other drivers, but be careful if it is a particularly blind corner).

It is a good idea to practice this off the road if you can – the more you do it the more intuitive it becomes.

2. Look Into the Curves

Another thing about turning that is pretty counterintuitive is that you always want to look into your curves. In fact, you want to look deep into your curves. Many riders make the mistake of looking straight ahead or to either side on a turn, but what you want to do is look up ahead and fix your eyes on the very spot you want to go, even if it’s not in visible sight. This neat trick will really surprise you when you find your bike going exactly where you look as if on its own.

3. Don’t Hug the Shoulder

I’m a big fan of defensive driving in any vehicle, and when you’re on a motorcycle, it is normal to be extremely nervous about any other vehicles around. You should be.

But one instance where a lot of motorcycle riders make a critical mistake is when they are on a fast-moving road and being tailgated, especially if there are a lot of aggressive drivers on the road. Many inexperienced riders will hug the shoulder in order to allow the other drivers to get around and go by.

But this is a mistake.

Hugging the shoulder like that doesn’t just let them go by – it encourages them to pass unsafely. And because you are on the side of the road, you are exposed to other dangers that might sneak up without warning even while you have the aggressive driver passing roadside. To make matters worse, any other driver coming from behind may not even see you because you are pulled off to the side.

Stay in the middle of the lane as if you were in a car. If the driver behind you gets too aggressive, pull off the road at the next safe turnout and then let them pass that way. Otherwise, they can use the passing lane like everyone else.

4. No Sudden Stops

Another danger in a motorcycle is stopping suddenly when we think we are about to get in an accident – much like swerving in a turn. It is always instinct to stop when we are about to hit something. After all, the last thing we want to do is hit it. But the problem is that a vehicle with two wheels is much less stable and top-heavy, and suddenly grabbing the brakes at high speed will very often lead into a slide and then a tumble. In some cases, you may even fly over the handle bars.

First off, drive at slow speeds and always be aware of what is going on. You should have a bigger safety cushion than when you are driving a car. If a danger comes out of nowhere, the best bet is to slow down and pull into a different path of movement at the same time,  thi bang lai xe may  steering away or around the threat.

As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I have been through the process of obtaining my M class certificate with the DMV and talking to an insurance agent about the minimum policy requirements for riding and owning a motorcycle. The steps are easy starting with finding the bike that suits your personality to passing the DMV written exam.

Side stepping a bit here to mention, completing the motorcycle skills test at the DMV in California is close to impossible. After failing it at my DMV appointment, the instructor recommended I take a two hundred fifty dollar motorcycle training course which, upon completion, provides for you the proper DMV certification for the skills portion of your M class rating. I highly recommend taking that route instead of embarrassing yourself at the DMV.

Now, it’s on to insurance. As far as insurance goes, the minimum requirements for insurance are the same as other vehicles in your state. So we will be talking comparatively as if the amounts of coverage for the motorcycle were the same as the amounts of coverage for the car.

Not to frighten you from owning and riding a motorcycle, but insurance companies are morbidly realistic about motorcycle riding, so you should be too. The brutal truth of the matter is this: if you are involved in a collision on a motorcycle, your likelihood of serious injury or death is exponentially greater than if you were in a car. And most of the time, you’re the only occupant on board. So there’s some interesting personal injury information for you to chew on.

And then there’s what the statistics say about repairing damaged property. Let’s consider the sheer physics. Motorcycles weigh 5 to 10 times less than the average car, truck or SUV. Where the motorcycle is often totaled out in the crash, the car will usually take minor to moderate damage. So as far as property damage goes, motorcycles do less damage to property because of the reduced mass.

Due to these facts stated above, the cost of all expenses to the insurance company from a motorcycle accident are on average much less than that of a car accident. And the insurance companies extend those statistical realities to you in the form of reduced premiums compared to your average automobile.

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